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I wish to change my staff notation into tonic -solfa . How it is possible in finale -27 ? for Windows 10.

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Welcome to the forum!

 

I do not know of an easy, fast, “automatic” solution that will convert standard staff notation into Tonic sol-fa notation, sorry.

 

Finale comes with ready made staff styles for

- Note Shapes

- Finale AlphaNotes Solfege

 

Have you tried those staff styles?

You asked for Tonic sol-fa notation, I know.

The staff styles {Note Shapes} and {Finale AlphaNotes Solfege} are not what you asked for, I know.

But perhaps you can find some use for the staff styles anyway?

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This is a critical function for choral work composers working especially with worship centers, that Finale overlooked but Sibelius integrated. I wish Finale can do something about it

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Then you are in the right place, as this is the Feature Request section.

Hope the powers-that-be consider it.

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Actually, there IS a Finale solution which I did not know about 10 months ago.

 

Tammy Allaboh,

 

Could you attach a graphic showing the layout you are talking about?

The better we understand, the better we can help.

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I looked up "tonic solfa" on Google.

 

Without wanting to insult anyone, I am amazed at the lengths people go to, to avoid learning/teaching standard notation.

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I guess one has to "start folks where they are," and helping a group make music together may provide an incentive to learn and do more. I recall starting on a three-octave Emminee (sp?) organ that used colors and key letters to help one play simple songs a nine-year-old might recognize. It was enough to get me started (trying) to write my own music, and my knowledge of music has improved in the years since. So while I can appreciate the value of standard notation, I'll support almost anything that moves those unfamiliar with it far enough along the way to inspire them.

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… the lengths people go to, to avoid learning/teaching standard notation …

 

As I see it, {tonic solfa} is a step on the road to learning standard notation.

The diatonic structure (half-steps and whole-steps) is the same as in standard notation.

 

If you really wanted to avoid standard notation, you might just as well choose another “alternate notation system” that has less similarity with standard notation.

According to the web site of alternate notation systems (= http://musicnotation.org/ ), there are about 500 alternate notation systems.

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My first experience with music was clarinet in 4th grade (and that didn't last long) and a couple years of piano lessons. I had nothing but standard notation.

 

I have to say, I don't get how this is any easier. And in fact, if that's what you learn, you will be greatly hindered later on.

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… I don't get how this is any easier. …

 

The general “Finale idea” is that if some “non-standard” layout is used by someone somewhere, then there ought to be a way to create that layout in Finale.

 

I could be wrong, but I think that the reason, why users ask for a way to create {tonic solfa notation} with Finale, is that {tonic solfa notation} is used somewhere (Tammy Allaboh mentioned worship centers).

 

Has anybody claimed that {tonic solfa notation} is any easier than standard notation?

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No, Peter, nobody has claimed it's easier. But it's so far from "standard" notation, that I wonder if it might not be easier in another program. I did this in Pages, but I'm sure it can be improved by someone who knows what they're doing.

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Tonic solfa  has been in use from time immemorial and has remained the favorite means for non professional choirs and singing enthusiasts. If Sibelius considered it imperative enough for inclusion, Finale should also consider. It in no way downgrades their app, but enhances it. And by the way, one man’s preference may be another’s jeopardy. Providing alternatives and options is a given in life as right of choice is a fundamental element of freedom.

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Tammy Allaboh,

 

Is the example Mike Rosen posted, the layout you are talking about?

 

Or could you attach a graphic showing an example of the {Tonic solfa notation} layout you are after?

I think there IS a Finale solution, but I need more info about the desired layout.

To me it seems that there are multiple variants of Tonic solfa notation.

 

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This is what it looks like. You plug in your notes and hit the button to generate the tonic solfa. A choir requested for the solfa notation for my work and a friend who uses Sibelius came to the rescue. I work with Finale and don't think I have the time  or desire to switch. But I sure would like to see this feature integrated into Finale. Thanks

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No need to make a political issue about it. Although I might question your statement about "favorite means for non-professional choirs and singing enthusiasts." Your people like it, go ahead and use it.

 

I have seen that use of the solfa, but only attached to the soprano line.

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Presumably, if Finale or a Finale plug-in virtuoso implements this, one will be able to arrange the spacing in a clearer, more attractive manner. (I certainly hope Sibelius can do this too and that this sheet was just proof-of-concept.)

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I do not belong to the sphere where inevitable politics comes before the importance of truth.
And the solfa IS NOT only attached to the soprano line.

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Yes, I can see that your solfa is not attached only to the soprano line. All I meant was that I, personally, have only seen it that way on some reprints from the mid-19th century.

 

But I still don’t see any advantage to that, over standard notation. Only that a subset of singers were taught that way, and want to continue. And as Adrian pointed out, I certainly hope that Sibelius can edit the page to be less crowded and more readable. Instead of two staves of music and one line of lyrics (for the most part) you now have eight lines of text for your singers to negotiate. Would you normally delete the standard notation at some point?

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I honestly find the tonic solfa very cumbersome. Unfortunately I am dealing with very talented singers and groups who, as you said, were taught that way and are resistant to change. So far, what I have always done was to transcribe manually until someone showed me that Sibelius could automate the process. Sibelius obviously cut off the organ part; I don't know if this was regular or intentional.
And yes, Adrian is right. Finale does give you a better outlay. I'm sure if and when they decide to include this feature, their outlay would be superior.
I'm not familiar with Sibelius but I imagine the standard notation stays as I've seen in many old books such Choral Anthems Volumes 1, 2 &3

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There is a free version of Sibelius available, although it’s for their most basic version (probably equivalent to Finale NotePad) and would no doubt be missing that feature.  I guess you would have to decide if you can get enough renumeration for the project to justify buying and learning the program.

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