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How can I reposition notes in a written chord? In this example, I would like the C# to be on the left of the stem (closer to the accidental) and the B to be on the right, which would make it easier to read.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

 

[Running Finale v25.5 under Mac OS10.13.6]

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I used the Notehead Positioning Tool. I had to manually adjust the ties. I don't think there is an automatic way to do this, though.

 

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Brilliant! I knew there had to be a way… just couldn't figure out what it was called.

 

Thanks, Mike!

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Hate to say this, Richard, but that position just looks wrong. There are pretty strict notational rules about how to position noteheads in a chord and this goes against them. Personally I don't find it easier to read, either. Part of the problem is that you have the eighth chord with the stem down. If you leave it stem up, you'll at least have the same positioning as the whole note chord. One thing you could do to get what you want is to separate the chord into two voices, with the c# in layer 1 and the rest of the chord in layer 2. Then Finale will place the c# to the left of the triad.

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The question was not whether the notation was standard, only how to do it. I cannot conceive of writing the chord that way either, but Richard asked the question and received the help he needed to manipulate the notation. That's what we try to do here.

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Agreed, although we should certainly point out when a request is contrary to "normal" notation. It's up to the user whether or not they want their notation to conform.

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Gentlemen....
I appreciate the comments about the proper notehead arrangement. If this was an engraving project for a symphony or publisher, that would be important to me. In this case, I’m building master rhythm charts for musicians who can’t have their faces buried in the page while they’re on stage, so I’m always looking for visual hints, cues, and layouts that make it easier for a player to find their way... even when they’re looking away from the page as much as they’re reading it. I still haven’t decided how I’m going to notate those few chords where notehead and accidental placement was at issue. Whatever reads faster will rule the day.

Thanks again for your time in responding.

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Just curious why you flipped the stem on the eighth chord. That’s the reason for the strange placement of the noteheads and especially for the fact that they’re different from the placement in the whole note chord which does, I agree, make it difficult to read.

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I sometimes flip stems to make more room at the top of the staff for chord symbols and articulations without having to add extra space between the staff and the part above or have the chord symbols float too far above the staff. It may not be "legit," but IMO it does make the part more legible.

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