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I would like to produce mp4 videos of my choral music created in Finale 26 (also some older versions). These mp4's are then sent to students and choristers to play on their computers and learn their parts.  At the present time, I send XML's of the music I want converted to someone who uses Sibelius and he converts my music to mp4's.  

I use Windows 7 (64-bit) and Finale 26 - I also have older Finale programs on my computer (Finale 2012, 2011 and 2009)

Does anyone know how I can create my own mp4's without having to go through the cycle I use above?

 

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Easy. I do it every week. Any app that can record your screen and capture audio will work. I don’t have an app to recommend for Windows since I do it on a Mac but there are many—I understand that some may be free. You will want something to edit your recording when done. If there’s an app that does both, that’s what you want.

 

Screen recording with audio is tricky on a Mac (Apple doesn’t want users doing this) but there are inexpensive apps that work. Trying to use Soundflower or BlackHole to make this work over QuickTime is a royal PIA but it’s doable. 

 

Zoom works well for this, also. Record your session and share the screen while Finale is playing.

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Thank you Mike for your comments.

If I use Zoom, can I simply record the Finale document in NotePad and share it with others in a Zoom session?  This way I could avoid complicating the project without having to resort to capturing the notation and play-back using mp4 format? I'm assuming that I would have to have all the attendees of the Zoom session download Finale NotePad 2012 in order to take part in the session.

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How are you expecting to use this with them? My choir director shares his screen of a PDF score, while sharing his computer audio, and we sing along. Of course, he can’t hear us, nor can we hear each other. You can share your NotePad screen and audio in Zoom, and record it for future viewing.

 

As far as I can tell, NotePad is no longer available in any version.

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Currently, the choral score (in mp4 format) is played at virtual Zoom rehearsals.  The attendees can see and hear the music and sing along as you've described. 

I simply want to know if I can avoid converting the Finale score to mp4 and use Finale NotePad to accomplish the same thing? Finale NotePad is still available for download, but you have to import any Finale file later than 2012 via XML into Finale 2012 (very easy to do) and then it can be opened with Finale NotePad.  The only question I have is: are the attendees of the virtual rehearsals required to have Finale NotePad on their computers in order to see and hear the music?

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No, not if you are sharing the score through Zoom. All they need to do is come to the meeting. It’s all done at your end.

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Thanks for your help, Mike.

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An overview: There are a number of ways for apps to output audio. With Zoom, only two count. One is system or “Computer Audio” in Zoom-speak; The other is the Zoom audio driver, required for anything interactive.

 

Playback of an mp4 normally uses computer audio — this is why a screen recording works so well, especially when you can use Zoom.app as the recorder by sharing your screen. I don’t know if Zoom ever added editing capabilities — there was talk of this but I haven’t paid attention—but if they did, perfect.

 

You use Zoom Audio if the output is interactive, say if you are demonstrating something live in a DAW or Finale. For my online choir rehearsals, if my wife is playing a MIDI triggered VI, I have to output to Zoom Audio. 48kHz is the only sample rate that the Zoom audio driver can use. With Windows, it involves Loopback—Mac does not. You can record this, of course but it’s not necessary if simply playing back a file—use computer audio for that. I have links to articles and a 73 page PDF on this if anyone needs. It devotes around 50 pages to making the Zoom audio driver work in Windows (about a page for Mac).

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Thank you gents, all, for helping me with this issue.  I think I have enough to proceed with my project.

 

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